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giuco_piano_guy 11 ( +1 | -1 )
Italian Game After the line (Giuco Piano - Classical Variation)

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.c3 Nf6 5.d4 exd4 6.cxd4 Bb4+

How do you save the pawns on both d4 and e4?
misato 36 ( +1 | -1 )
7. Bd2 looks natural and is quite okay (probably the best answer), Black will not be happy capturing the pawn on e4, just two example lines:
7. Bd2 Nxe4 8. Bxb4 Nxb4 9. Bxf7+ Kxf7 10. Qb3+ and Black is in problems.
7. Bd2 Bxd2+ 8. Nxd2 Nxe4 9. Nxe4 d5 10. Qe2 0-0 11. 0-0-0 with Black getting back his piece in the end, but also okay for White.

May the good moves be always with you.
indiana-jay 134 ( +1 | -1 )
The Giuoco is very very strong when used against or among amateur players. That’s because the concept of early development and the power of pieces advancement (space occupation and pressure) is rarely understood by lowly rated players. The black’s king is subject to direct attack from Black’s all pieces, except for the queen’s knight that is a bit underdeveloped (exchanging bishops on d2 is a way to bring the knight into play).

Taking e4 in general will open line for white’s kingside rook, and it is directly against the white’s king!

Qb3 is a thematic move here. It gives pressure on the white’s king via the f7 pawn. Both sides must be prepared for this move as this can also fork black’s pieces. Black’s Na5 is a thematic move against Qb3.

Another strategic thinking in Giuoco as white in closed variations (as is also in other games) imho is to have a flexibility of the pieces to shift the attack from queenside to kingside, by direct shifting of the bishop, the queen and the queenside rook. But this is more advanvce.

Try to understand the concept behind gambit play (We sacrifice a pawn not for nothing, but for something, right?), then you can try or exercise with the gambit variation of the giuoco piano (b2-b4). In simpler word, don't care too much on pawn, all you need to think is: pressurize and attack!
indiana-jay 136 ( +1 | -1 )
typo errors The Giuoco is very very strong when used against or among amateur players. That’s because the concept of early development and the power of pieces advancement (space occupation and pressure) is rarely understood by lowly rated players. The black’s king is subject to direct attack from Black’s all pieces, except for the queen’s knight that is a bit underdeveloped (exchanging bishops on d2 is a way to bring the knight into play).

Taking e4 in general will open line for white’s kingside rook, and it is directly against the black’s king!

White's Qb3 is a thematic move here. It gives pressure on the black’s king via the f7 pawn. Both sides must be prepared for this move as this can also fork black’s pieces. Black’s Na5 is a thematic move against white's Qb3.

Another strategic thinking in Giuoco as white in closed variations (as is also in other games) imho is to have a flexibility of the pieces to shift the attack from queenside to kingside, by direct shifting of the bishop, the queen and the queenside rook. But this is more advanvce.

Try to understand the concept behind gambit play (We sacrifice a pawn not for nothing, but for something, right?), then you can try or exercise with the gambit variation of the giuoco piano (b2-b4). In simpler word, don't care too much on pawn, all you need to think is: pressurize and attack!
indiana-jay 0 ( +1 | -1 )
Oh, I give up :D .
trond 49 ( +1 | -1 )
No way to save both e and d pawns But you could try 6. e5 , and then 7. cxd4 if he moves his knight on f6. Be aware that 6. e5 might be met by ... d5. At least the game will not be boring.

7. Bd2 is another option, when you get the pawn on f7 for the pawn on e4.

7. Nc3 is another line that you might try, were you often will get the attack at the cost of a pawn. There are also many ways for black to mess up in this line, but if he/she knows theory black is fine and might get a small advantage (but I doubt that will happen often in your games).
trond 10 ( +1 | -1 )
One correction There is one way to save both e and d pawns. If 6. e5 is met by 6. ...d5, then after 7. Bb5 Ne4 8. cxd4 Bb4+ 9. Bd2 you have kept you e and d pawns.
indiana-jay 74 ( +1 | -1 )
trond, I haven't seen yet where black can get a small advantage from this opening. In the gambit variation yes but is not enough for 1600 player to take advantage from. I can only guess that 2000 players left this opening because of the drawish ending, just like the Ruy Lopez? I found that reasons like having been studied thoroughly is a bit... irrational? The line misato suggested is I think the best black can get. Indeed it is a boring game. I'm using it simply for easy wins :) But I'm using it also against 2100+ player to see what is in this opening that makes highly rated players left.
ccmcacollister 143 ( +1 | -1 )
Is Giuoco analyzed to death ? . id-indiana-jay , I think you hit it on the head. 2100+ players disliking the drawishness of many Giuoco lines, possibly boredom. [Of course they might alleviate that by playing the Wilkes-Barre attack! Tho I'm not one who believes in it, from the little I've seen of it.]
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I would groan even in blitz games when 3.Bc4 was played when I was relying on 3...Bc5 in reply, and just hope it would be an Evans Gambit which interests me more... not a Giuoco. And its lines with d3 instead of c3 are even more tedious to me. So after wading thru many BL lines of the Two Knights that I don't care for, finally found one that I do like.
If you can get a higher rated player to enter a drawish var it may be beneficial in getting them to overplay the position trying to win. Sometimes boring a high-rated player may be of advantage to you then, but on the other-hand they may decide it would be 'interesting' to "test" their opponent for 120 moves when in a position they know they cant lose if they dont overplay it. That can be unpleasant. Especially over 2 years in a true Postal game! ... }8-)
But on the other-other-hand, if you want to reach an endgame and try your skills out there . . .
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Back in the 70's when I studied the Giuoco; most common was 7.Nc3 and 7.Bd2 was considered the less risky alternative. But in the Nc3 line 7...Nxe4 and capturing all the way thru with ...Nxc3 ...Bxc3 ... Bxa1 was winning for WT. Too greedy. Unless some improvement has shown up (if anyone was working on it ??! :)
giuco_piano_guy 2 ( +1 | -1 )
thanks, guys.